Optional Activity #9. Our local (and regional) elections in the international press

Read these articles and answer the questions below. Submit your answers in a comment here to be published on Monday, 1st June.

The Guardian

BBC

The New York Times

1. How are Ada Colau, Manuela Carmena, Pablo Iglesias and Podemos refered to in the articles? Find at least 7 different adjectives and expressions to describe them. Quote the sentences.

2. Why does Antonio Barroso say that “the coming months could see the emergence of political stalemate in many places across the country”?

3. What is the meaning of “stalemate”? Use the word in a sentence.

4. What are the reasons for the heavy losses the PP has suffered?

5. Why does Pablo Iglesias say that May 24 election results imply the end of traditional politics in Spain?

6,7,8. Find out the meaning of “heartland”, “bubble burst” and “stronghold” in the BBC article. Write your own sentences using these words and expressions.

9. According to Mariano Rajoy, what does his party need to change?

10. Who (what party) does Rajoy think should govern in each region?

About Mireia Xortó

Hi! I'm a teacher of English as a Foreign Language (EFL) for ESO & Batxillerat at Institut Francesc Macià in Cornellà.
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3 Responses to Optional Activity #9. Our local (and regional) elections in the international press

  1. Alba Recort says:

    1. How are Ada Colau, Manuela Carmena, Pablo Iglesias and Podemos refered to in the articles? Find at least 7 different adjectives and expressions to describe them. Quote the sentences.
    The guardian:
    “leftist parties” in “analysts said that coalitions between leftist parties could see the PP ousted from power in as many as half a dozen regions.”
    “indignados” in “Rajoy’s remarks came as the indignados continue to celebrate their victory in Barcelona and a strong showing in Madrid.”
    BBC:
    “Anti-eviction activist Ada Colau”
    “Anti-austerity parties” in “Anti-austerity parties, linked to the Podemos movement on the far left”.
    NY times:
    “anti-establishment candidates” in “The success of anti-establishment candidates, who ran for small local parties”.
    “Podemos (We Can), a far-left party” in “Instead, Podemos (We Can), a far-left party, and — to a lesser extent — Ciudadanos (Citizens), a center-right party, emerged as the new kingmakers of Spanish politics.”.
    “different, fresh and nonprofessional politicians” in “Ms. Colau and Ms. Carmena “can claim to be different, fresh and nonprofessional politicians,” said Mr. Arias-Maldonado, the politics professor.”

    2. Why does Antonio Barroso say that “the coming months could see the emergence of political stalemate in many places across the country”?
    Because if parties with different ideas make a coalition, they won’t be able to arrive to a conclusion with the things they’ll have to decide and it will end in stalemate.
    3. What is the meaning of “stalemate”? Use the word in a sentence.
    A situation in which further action is blocked. Ex: our conversation ended in stalemate.
    4. What are the reasons for the heavy losses the PP has suffered?
    public spending cuts and reports of political corruption.
    5. Why does Pablo Iglesias say that May 24 election results imply the end of traditional politics in Spain?
    Because votes are changing and more and more people is voting anti-conservative parties instead of the traditional ones they used to vote.
    6,7,8. Find out the meaning of “heartland”, “bubble burst” and “stronghold” in the BBC article. Write your own sentences using these words and expressions.
    heartland: the part of a region considered essential to the viability and survival of the whole. Ex: Our heartland is full of buildings.
    bubble burst: crash of economics. Ex: prices started to grow since the bubble burst.
    stronghold: a place that serves as the center of a group or movement sharing certain opinions or attitudes. Ex: That campus is a stronghold of liberalism.
    9. According to Mariano Rajoy, what does his party need to change?
    theapproach to voters, they need to be closer to Spaniards and communicate more with them.
    10. Who (what party) does Rajoy think should govern in each region?
    PP because is the most voted party in each region to govern, so he thinks it’s what the majority of Spaniards wants.

  2. Andrés Vílchez Fernández says:

    1. How are Ada Colau, Manuela Carmena, Pablo Iglesias and Podemos refered to in the articles? Find at least 7 different adjectives and expressions to describe them. Quote the sentences.
    – Anti-austerity Podemos movement (BBC) : “Spain’s anti-austerity Podemos movement has vowed to defeat the governing Popular Party (PP) in national polls this year, after its dramatic gains in Sunday’s local and regional elections”.
    – The leftist movement’s leader, Pablo Iglesias (BBC) :” The leftist movement’s leader, Pablo Iglesias, said the result spelt the end of traditional politics in Spain, which has been dominated by two parties”.
    -Anti-eviction activist Ada Colau (BBC) “Anti-eviction activist Ada Colau, who is supported by Podemos, won the most votes in the mayoral race for Barcelona, Spain’s second largest city”.
    – Ms. Colau, a former activist who fought housing evictions (The New York Times): <>.
    – Ms. Carmena, a retired judge (The New York Times): “Ms. Carmena, a retired judge, did not win in Madrid, but her strong showing nonetheless made it very likely that she would become mayor of Spain’s capital next month, at the helm of a coalition with the Socialists”.
    – The success of anti-establishment candidates (refering to Ms. Colau and Ms. Carmena -The New York Times) :”The success of anti-establishment candidates, who ran for small local parties, in the two largest Spanish cities underlined the fragmentation of Spain’s politics, as well as the precipitous slide of the governing Popular Party of Prime Minister Mariano Rajoy, ahead of general elections this year”.
    – A tearful Ms. Colau (The New York Times): <>.

    2. Why does Antonio Barroso say that “the coming months could see the emergence of political stalemate in many places across the country”?
    Because in the next months general elections will be held and he thinks that Podemos will take nice results.

    3. What is the meaning of “stalemate”? Use the word in a sentence.
    It’s a deadlock, a dead end. E.g.: The talks for an agreement ended in a stalemate.

    4. What are the reasons for the heavy losses the PP has suffered?
    The reasons are the internal corruption, the high levels of unemployement and the public spending cuts.

    5. Why does Pablo Iglesias say that May 24 election results imply the end of traditional politics in Spain?
    Because he thinks it would be the end of bipartisan system, caused by the breakthrough of the new parties (Ciudadanos and Podemos).

    6,7,8. Find out the meaning of “heartland”, “bubble burst” and “stronghold” in the BBC article. Write your own sentences using these words and expressions.
    Heartland: important area, heart of something -Madrid is the heartland of Spain.
    Bubble burst: (estallido de la burbuja inmobiliaria) – The bubble burst affected a lot to the Spanish economy.
    Stronghold: base of power – Public investment is the stronghold of the economy.

    9. According to Mariano Rajoy, what does his party need to change?
    He thinks they should be closer with Spaniards and communicate more with them, approach to voters.

    10. Who (what party) does Rajoy think should govern in each region?
    He thinks the most voted party in each region should govern, with alliances.

  3. Victor Carrasco says:

    Victor Carrasco

    1. In The Guardian, they are referred as the “indignados” ( the country’s indignados performed strongly in elections in two big cities.) (the indignados continue to celebrate their victory in Barcelona and a strong showing in Madrid.)
    “Anti-austerity Podemos” (Spain’s anti-austerity Podemos movement has vowed to defeat the governing Popular Party (PP))
    Leftish movement (The leftist movement’s leader, Pablo Iglesias)
    Anti-eviction (Anti-eviction activist Ada Colau, who is supported by Podemos,)
    Anti-establishment (The success of anti-establishment candidates,)
    Far-left party (Podemos (We Can), a far-left party,)
    2.
    Because parties nowadays do not want to make a coalition to be stronger in the general elections in November.
    3.
    A stalemate is when something is stopped and not going on. “This building is going to be on a stalemate because there is no money to finance it.”
    4.
    One of the main reasons is the corruption that has been leaked in the PP’s years of government and the rise of the left-sided parties.
    5.
    Because the traditional politics in Spain are run by the people’s party and the PSOE and they say that this is the first lose for them and they will cruch in November.
    6, 7, 8
    A heartland is a place where a party has always been at the top and will surely get the victory there.
    Bubble burst means that a good time for someone has ended, for example when someone makes a lot of money but economy backfires him.
    A stronghold is the main place of a party or an army, where they feel completely safe and can’t be defeated.
    9.
    He says they are open to make coalitions with the winners of each region of Spain.
    10.
    He thinks the winner should govern because it’s what the majority wants, but they are open to make a coalition.

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